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 Post subject: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 7:01 am 
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Does anyone make their own mustard?
Care to share your recipe(s)?

I've made a dijon mustard a few times (from various recipes found on the internet). These were all rather bitter at first but some mellowed after a week or two.

However I don't want to buy a bottle of wine just to make mustard (as I don't drink alcohol and so the rest of the bottle will go to waste).

So I'm now in search of a whole grain mustard recipe or even a smooth yellow mustard. Along with any tips and tricks you'd like to share.

What herbs do you like to add?

I've watched a few youtube videos on these but wondering if any of you can offer something else, before I make another attempt.

Thanks!


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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 7:45 am 
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My mustard was not successful but what I do for wine is get a Black Box. It keeps for maybe six weeks. I don’t drink but I cook with wine, the alcohol cooks out. I was buying a bottle and using a cup snd having to throw the rest out.

I did mustard once and it was far too sour for me. Wishing I could help on that.


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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 8:00 am 
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Thanks, but I just don't use enough wine for cooking to justify the cost or frig space.

I do keep a small jar of dry vermouth around for cooking (and sometimes a dry sherry too), but those have a great shelf life and don't need to be refrigerated.


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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 11:27 am 
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I do not drink either but when I need some wine for cooking, I usually pour the unused portion into ice cube trays and freeze and once frozen, pop them into a freezer bag and store in the freezer. Just grab a couple cubes to add to stews, etc. as needed for cooking. I don't currently have any in the freezer, otherwise I would offer you some cubes!


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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 12:33 pm 
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Thanks! That's a better solution for extra wine! I didn't know it would freeze given the alcohol content. I usually just pour it down the drain.

My freezers are usually packed full. But I could probably find a small nook or cranny in a freezer for a few wine cubes!

I saw a youtube video today that uses white wine vinegar for a Dijon style mustard!
Also watched a video on fermented mustard. Interesting!

I've got a busy week and need to buy some fresh mustard seeds; but come this weekend I'm gonna make mustard!

I hate buying processed food, especially if it has more than 2 ingredients. I much prefer things made from scratch. I make all my own jams, relish, salad dressing, etc. But I still buy ketchup, mustard and mayo.
I love making my own mayo (and aioli) for certain things but the shelf life is not good.

I'd love a good ketchup recipe too.


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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 12:53 pm 
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Ahh mustard making, kitchen chemistry at its finest! I love going to Indian/Asian/Mediterranean markets and drooling over all the mustard seeds/powders. I also recently discovered this "Oriental" mustard powder on Amazon: https://amzn.to/31AtI2g Just mix with water to desired consistency and it tastes EXACTLY like the hot yellow mustard you get in Asian-American restaurants. Easiest mustard ever. :)

Making real mustard is a simple process, in concept, not so much in practice. There are SO MANY recipes out there! As there should be, because there are limitless flavor combinations, but I think many recipes miss a crucial step. Basically, you're just creating a reaction between the ground mustard and a cold, non-acidic (alkaline) liquid...then stopping that reaction with an acid (usually vinegar.) I think the step most people miss is the time between causing and halting that reaction. Many, if not most, recipes have you mix all the ingredients together and either store 24-48 hours or process immediately...or actually cook it over the stove! 8O The ONLY control you have over the flavor with those methods is quantities and add-on ingredients. But every mustard seed is different, and varying acid levels of vinegars are different, and the reaction takes time, so it's blind luck how it comes out.

I say, why leave it to chance? Let that reaction go on for awhile, tasting along the way. The spicy zing builds and usually peaks after somewhere around 10 minutes, then starts to slowly mellow. You can stop the process by adding vinegar at ANY point. If you have a particularly bitter seed/powder, wait until after the peak before adding the vinegar. This should reduce the bitterness and greatly reduce the waiting period until it's ready for consumption. Alternatively, some people like the bitter bite and can stop the process before the peak. You can use that same basic method to modify any mustard recipe out there to get better results. It really doesn't matter if you're using straight powder to make a smooth yellow mustard, or using all cracked seeds, or a combo (which is what I prefer). It doesn't matter if you soak the seeds first, which is a texture I sometimes enjoy. It's always the same basic process, just leave the acid out of the recipe until after the reaction begins. With good seeds/powder, for most mustard lovers, the 10 minute mark is usually about perfect. You can test this out right now if you have some Colman's (or any other mustard powder) in your cupboard. Mix a little with some cold water and taste it right away, then keep occasionally tasting it over 10 minutes. The bitter will turn to zing and blow your mind.

Other than that I suggest small batches, a pint jar at a time at most, at least until you get a recipe as close to perfect as you can, and even then just to give to friends. Like horseradish, heat kills heat, so canning really changes the flavor, especially at our altitude. And it has vinegar, so freezing will alter the flavor as well (freezing also alters the flavor of wine btw.) I've never had a pint last long enough to go bad in the fridge.

You can make a decent approximation of dijon by using cold water and white wine vinegar, Verjus would be better if you can find it. Sherry mustard is fantastic, some good recipes online. You mentioned vermouth, so this webpage was immediately added to my bookmarks:
http://www.edibleboston.com/blog/vermou ... e-and-fine
I saw a recipe once that used Worcestershire as the acid, I definitely need to experiment with that.

But my hands-down favorite is beer mustard (small batch, maybe 4 oz.):

1 1/2 tablespoons yellow mustard seeds
1 1/2 tablespoons brown mustard seeds
1/3 cup mustard powder
scant 1/3 cup cold lager/ale (90 Shilling)
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon sea salt

Grind the seeds until just cracked and add to a non-reactive bowl with the powder. Add beer and stir. This is a perfectly acceptable mustard as is, but I usually spend this time occasionally tasting it and going through my pantry thinking about what I might add; dill, tarragon, paprika, ancho, honey, real maple syrup...whatever strikes my fancy. The flavor should peak right around 10 minutes, which is where I like it. Add the vinegar and stir to stop the reaction, then add salt and any seasoning(s). Cover the bowl and refrigerate. After 1-2 days it is fantastic! You can really have fun with this one by experimenting with different brews!

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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 1:07 pm 
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CooknThyme wrote:
I'd love a good ketchup recipe too.

I do not have one of those, but I should. I do have two bookmarks for chipotle ketchup that I'm planning on trying to combine some day:
http://recipecircus.com/recipes/Katie/P ... tchup.html
http://megatarian.blogspot.com/2012/08/ ... atsup.html


I've also, over the last couple years, been making our own sour cream with culture packets from New England Cheesemaking Supply Company. It's best and tastiest with raw milk, but works great for me with ultra-pasteurized heavy cream from the grocery store. Not as flavorful, but plenty thick and definitely better than store bought sour cream. If you ever want to try it, let me know and I'll describe the process I use.

I also have a recipe for homemade ranch dressing mix. I found it on the interwebs many years ago and it has since disappeared. Secret ingredient is saltine crackers.

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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 2:09 pm 
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Wow ECG thank you soooooooooooo much for all that info!!

elkcreekgeek wrote:
... I think many recipes miss a crucial step. Basically, you're just creating a reaction between the ground mustard and a cold, non-acidic (alkaline) liquid...then stopping that reaction with an acid (usually vinegar.) I think the step most people miss is the time between causing and halting that reaction.


That makes so much sense. And none of the videos explained that. But I totally get it! Thanks!

I was planning on soaking the seeds in flavored water (boil up some onions, garlic, herbs; strain and cool). Do you have opinions on the pro/cons of a presoak?

I was also planning to make a small batch to test and then a bigger batch for canning. Thank you for the "heat kills heat" warning when it comes to mustard too.

I normally don't care for hot mustard (most Asian mustard is way too hot for me). But I do want some zip. Sometimes store bought is too mild and so I end up adding horseradish to it.

I'll have to play around with the heat aspect (as I'm mostly a whimp when it comes to heat). I love lots of "spicy flavor" but only mild heat, if that makes sense. I was planning to use mostly yellow seeds and only a few black/brown seeds, instead of the 50/50 mix I see in most recipes.

I'd love to be able to make a big batch and then can it (water bath). But if that's out of the question then that changes the picture for me. Maybe mustard will end up being on par with homemade mayo... just for special occasions and not everyday use.


I am familiar with New England Cheesemaking Supply Company. I've tried my hand at cheesemaking and for me it's not worth the effort (and space). But an occasional mozzarella is fun.

When I had easy, cheap access to raw cows milk I use to make my own sour cream, yogurt, butter and kefir. But with pasteurized milk I only continued with the kefir (with real kefir grains not the those packets of 1 time use dried cultures).

Thanks again ECG for your input. I really appreciate it.


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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 3:30 pm 
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I'm all for soaking, especially in flavored water. The seeds really get all hydrated and plump and makes great consistency smooth mustard, and awesome little flavor explosions if some are left whole. I'll sometimes soak a handful and add them right before the vinegar just for the texture.

A lot of people do can their mustard and rave about it. If you can find that perfect combination of the right reaction time and bwb time...generally takes some knowledge from a local who's been doing it at your altitude for a while...or a lot of trial and error. I've never tried it. It might just work perfectly for you to help tone it down a little bit?

I recently heard there's someone selling raw milk up here, have to track them down. I REALLY want to make some fresh mozz. Have to pick your brain if that happens. :)

And you're very welcome, I know I over-explained it for you, but hopefully others will get good info out of it too. I did a TON of research trying to figure out how to make it not so bitter, kind of a surprisingly overlooked technique amongst all the food bloggers/vloggers.

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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 4:50 pm 
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The only "local" raw cow's milk that I know of is from Ebert Farms. There's another one near Fort Collins (but I forget their name).

You can buy cow shares (the only legal way to buy raw milk) from Ebert Farms. The cost is higher than for pasteurized organic from the stores, but the quality is awesome (luscious cream at the top! YUM!). Pricing can sound complicated but it works out to be about $6.75 for a 1/2 gal. Minimum order is 1/2 gal per week. People getting 2gal or more every week get discounts.

They sell other stuff too for cow share members (eggs, chicken, beef, pork, etc.)

Their Farm is near Byers. But they deliver (on Tuesdays?) to Buster's Natural Pet food store in Conifer for pick up. I think Buster's will hold it for you for a couple of days.

Also there are people up here that sell goat shares but I don't know any details. Goat milk cheese is awesome but otherwise I don't like goat's milk.


BTW, you don't need raw milk to make fresh mozzarella (but it is best with raw milk). I use the starter culture, rennet and recipe from New England Cheesemaking Supply Company! Check it out.

They also have an quick/instant method but I didn't like that one.


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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 21, 2019 6:12 pm 
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That is all fantastic info! Thank you!

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 Post subject: Re: Homemade mustard recipes
Post Posted: Oct 22, 2019 7:23 am 
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Totally off the mustard topic but Kalona


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